Poison in our Food Supply!

Toxic Gut Syndrome is the impact that various environmental toxins have over the intestinal wellbeing. In fact , the microbiota (living bacteria in the gut) is considered a delicate ecosystem; A Living Organism Within a Living Organism: all humans and considered essential for life and wellbeing. A disruption of this ecosystem directly affects the way we absorb nutrients, energy, sugars, and inactivate cancer causing agents. Obesity and diabetes are modern diseases since they were practically unheard of in the late seventies and early eighties. Diabetes and Obesity dramatically increased in the late eighties with several other relatively unknown diseases including, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis, Clinical Depression, ADHD and Autism to name a few. All these disease have coincided with the widespread and undiscriminated use Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides and Chemical Fertilizers in our food. One example is that over 90% of our food is contaminated with toxic levels of Glyphosate. 

A Fat Diabetic World

Diabetes and Obesity is now official a Pandemic, this means that they have grown to epidemic proportions affecting every corner of the earth. Never before has such a devastating disease put mans survival at risk. The top Scientists and leading researchers around the world are re-considering the traditional thinking thatvocer-eating and lack of exercise was the cause of this epidemic. A global epidemic that took 30 years to develop cannot be explained and blamed on simple lifestyle. This epidemic is affecting countries that until a decade ago the disease was unknown. Listed to Professor Francesco Rubino's of King's College in London, interviewed  by Dr Ariel Ortiz of Obesity Control Center here. Video

The Global Epidemic

Infectious or Toxic. Only a few agents can cause a global epidemic. It is either an infectious agent like bacterias, viruses or other living organisms and Toxins. Since infectious agents can be ruled out as the cause of obesity and diabetes we have to look closer at toxic agents. Toxins are prevalent in our environment: We breath them, wear them, come in contact with all type toxins in our daily routine, we drink them and of course we consume them in our food! 

You're Brain is the Solution!

What you know is the only way out of this life threatening problem. Who can we trust? Our food sources come directly from the soil, to the plant, from the plan to the animal, or from the animal or what it produces. In this simple chain there are numerous human interventions along the way. In a for profit business motivated by yields and earnings, every middle man adds to the toxic load of our food, like pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, and chemical fertilizers. The problem of toxins in our food is largely overlooked and poorly understood by the common consumer. Thousands of peer reviewed scientific articles link most of these toxins to disease and cancer. It is up to you as the consumer, (you and me) to fully understand what our food has been subjected to and how to avoid toxic food. 

Toxic Gut Syndrome

That gut feeling you had? You were right all along! Since blaming habits and lifestyle cannot explain this devastating epidemic that the world is now facing, it is time to look inward. As deep as our own intestines. Science has always considered the gut as simple conduit through which water and nutrients are absorbed after being consumed. But the gut is much more than a pipe. It is involved in highly complex and poorly understood mechanisms that regulate the selection, breakdown, transformation absorption of micro nutrients to other more complex activities like regulating the immunes system. In fact it is the gut and the neural and hormonal pathways that regulate the secretion of Insulin and other active peptides (proteins) in charge of hunger, satiety, energy expenditure and storage and other roles that have perplexed science for years. It is easy to understand how intoxicating your gut with the contaminants in the food your eat can lead to chronic disease and early death.

Microbiota: The life inside of you.

A living organism within a living organism,the bacterial community that co-exist with us in our gut is medically known as the Microbiota. A delicate ecosystem of bacteria and other life forms living inside your gut, essential to life itself, yet science still us learning the important this ecosystem and how it helps maintain the  balance between disease and health. For years we have blamed lifestyle and habits to explain the obesity and diabetes epidemic, but that theory is no longer valid. There are hundreds of peer reviewed scientific articles linking the consumption of environmental toxins specifically in our food and the destruction of the microbiota and the resulting impact in our health, One example  was published by senior research team at MIT in 2013 explaining the pathways that  the weedkiller Glyphosate (Roundup Weedkiller) present in our food is a potential cause of Obesity, Diabetes, Cancer, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, ADHD,  and Autism. You can download the whole article  here. 

 

Your food is poisoned

GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) is the first sign that your food has been sprayed with and absorbed toxic chemicals. The main reason Corn and Soy are genetically altered is so that they become resistant to a weed killer known as Roundup® These grains are sold at a premium to growers (commercially sold as Round-Up Ready Crops)  as they are easier to grow and produce higher tyields simply because they can be sprayed up to 20 ppm with the weed killer known as roundup. Since they are more expensive, no grower would pay a premium price for the genetically altered grain and then not spray it, right? USDA department reports that over 90% of the Corn and Soy grown in America is Genetically Modified thus it is always sprayed with round up. Roundup's active ingredient is Glyphosate, a derivative of Agent Orange from the Vietnam era. Its widespread use is justified by the label that reads "not toxic to humans", but as you read how the chemical works, it states it only interferes and kills plants and bacteria. Yes! The same bacteria living inside our gut essential to our well being. You will be surprised to know that mots fruits and vegetables have been sprayed with Roundup. Corn, Soy and Sugar Beets are all Genetically Modified Roundup ready crops and used to manufacture most processed foods. They are also the number one source of sweetness in processed foods.  

The Supporting Literature

Pigrau, M., Rodiño-Janeiro, B., Casado-Bedmar, M., Lobo, B., Vicario, M., Santos, J. and Alonso-Cotoner, C. (2015) ‘The joint power of sex and stress to modulate brain-gut-microbiota axis and intestinal barrier homeostasis: Implications for irritable bowel syndrome’, Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society., .

"Interestingly, the role of stress, sex and gonadal hormones in the regulation of intestinal mucosal and the brain-gut-microbiome axis functioning is being increasingly recognized." (Pigrau et al., 2015)

"Irritable bowel syndrome is prevalent stress-sensitive gastrointestinal disorder that shows a female predominance." (Pigrau et al., 2015)

"Dysfunction of the brain-gut-microbiome axis may induce the loss of gut mucosal homeostasis, leading to uncontrolled permeation of toxins and immunogenic particles, increasing the risk of appearance of intestinal inflammation, mucosal damage, and gut disorders." (Pigrau et al., 2015)

"In addition, the brain-gut-microbiome axis, a multidirectional communication system that integrates distant and local regulatory networks through neural, immunological, metabolic, and hormonal signaling pathways, also regulates intestinal function." (Pigrau et al., 2015)

 

"When combined and preserved, immune surveillance and barrier's selective permeability, the host capacity of preventing the development of intestinal inflammation is optimized, and viceversa" (Pigrau et al., 2015)

 

Arrieta, M.C., Bistritz, L. and Meddings, J.B. (2006) ‘Alterations in intestinal permeability’, 55(10).

"the relevance of abnormal permeability to disease...an emerging paradigm regarding the genesis of autoimmune diseases" (Arrieta, Bistritz, and Meddings, 2006)

Chassaing, B., Etienne-Mesmin, L. and Gewirtz, A.T. (2013) ‘Microbiota-Liver axis in Hepatic disease’, 59(1).

"the microbiota is at least as metabolically complex as the liver, and that the microbiota should not be viewed as entirely alien but rather as having coevolved with the intestine. Metabolic activity of the microbiota provides a great benefit to human health both by providing essential nutrients and maximizing the efficiency of energy harvest from ingested food. However, the microbiota also contains numerous potential opportunistic pathogens and thus has the potential to harm its host if this complex microbial community is not well managed." (Chassaing, Etienne-Mesmin, and Gewirtz, 2013)

De Santis, S., Cavalcanti, E., Mastronardi, M., Jirillo, E. and Chieppa, M. (2015) ‘Nutritional keys for intestinal barrier modulation’, 6.

"The intestinal tract represents the largest interface between the external environment and the human body. Nutrient uptake mostly happens in the intestinal tract, where the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to dietary antigens...inflammatory response toward these antigens may be deleterious for the host," (De Santis et al., 2015)

Fasano, A. (2011) ‘Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases’, Clinical reviews in allergy & immunology., 42(1), pp. 71–8.

"Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs...from impaired intestinal barrier function." (Fasano, 2011)

Fasano, A. and Shea-Donohue, T. (2005) ‘Mechanisms of disease: The role of intestinal barrier function in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal autoimmune diseases’, Nature clinical practice. Gastroenterology & hepatology., 2(9), pp. 416–22.

"When the finely tuned trafficking of macromolecules is dysregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, both intestinal and extraintestinal autoimmune disorders can occur." (Fasano and Shea-Donohue, 2005)

"another extremely important function of this organ is its ability to regulate the trafficking of macromolecules between the environment and the host through a barrier mechanism." (Fasano and Shea-Donohue, 2005)

"The primary functions of the gastrointestinal tract have traditionally been perceived to be limited to the digestion and absorption of nutrients and electrolytes, and to water homeostasis." (Fasano and Shea-Donohue, 2005)

Frazier, T., DiBaise, J. and McClain, C. (2011) ‘Gut microbiota, intestinal permeability, obesity-induced inflammation, and liver injury’, JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition., 35.

"it appears that the microbiota function much like a metabolic "organ," influencing nutrient acquisition, energy homeostasis, and, ultimately, the control of body weight. Moreover, alterations in gut microbiota, increased intestinal permeability, and metabolic endotoxemia likely play a role in the development of a chronic low-grade inflammatory state in the host that contributes to the development of obesity and associated chronic metabolic diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease." (Frazier, DiBaise, and McClain, 2011)

Gress, S., Lemoine, S., Séralini, G. and Puddu, P. (2014) ‘Glyphosate-based herbicides potently affect cardiovascular system in mammals: Review of the literature’, Cardiovascular toxicology., 15(2), pp. 117–26.

"Glyphosate-based herbicides potently affect cardiovascular system in mammals" (Gress et al., 2014)

Kelly, J., Kennedy, P., Cryan, J., Dinan, T., Clarke, G. and Hyland, N. (2015) ‘Breaking down the barriers: The gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders’, Frontiers in cellular neuroscience., 9.

"the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted." (Kelly et al., 2015)

"Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability." (Kelly et al., 2015)

"Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis." (Kelly et al., 2015)

Lamprecht, M., Bogner, S., Schippinger, G., Steinbauer, K., Fankhauser, F., Hallstroem, S., Schuetz, B. and Greilberger, J. (2012) ‘Probiotic supplementation affects markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation, and inflammation in trained men; a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial’, Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition., 9(1).

"probiotic supplementation beneficially affected TNF-α and exercise induced protein oxidation" (Lamprecht et al., 2012)

Lamprecht, M. and Frauwallner, A. (2012) ‘Exercise, intestinal barrier dysfunction and probiotic supplementation’, Medicine and sport science., 59, pp. 47–56.

"the potential of probiotic supplementation to counteract an exercise-induced leaky gut." (Lamprecht and Frauwallner, 2012)

"The integrity of tight junctions depends on sophisticated interactions between the gut residents and their expressed substances, the intestinal epithelial cell metabolism and the activities of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue." (Lamprecht and Frauwallner, 2012)

"Athletes exposed to high-intensity exercise show an increased occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like cramps, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, and bleeding. These problems have been associated with alterations in intestinal permeability and decreased gut barrier function. The increased GI permeability, a so-called 'leaky gut', also leads to endotoxemia, and results in increased susceptibility to infectious and autoimmune diseases, due to absorption of pathogens/toxins into tissue and the bloodstream." (Lamprecht and Frauwallner, 2012)

Molinaro, F., Paschetta, E., Cassader, M., Gambino, R. and Musso, G. (2012) ‘Probiotics, prebiotics, energy balance, and obesity: Mechanistic insights and therapeutic implications’, Gastroenterology clinics of North America., 41(4), pp. 843–54.

"mechanisms connecting gut microbiota to obesity and fat storage and the potential therapeutic role of probiotics and prebiotics." (Molinaro et al., 2012)

Pastorelli, L., Salvo, D., Mercado, J., Vecchi, M. and Pizarro, T. (2013) ‘Central role of the gut epithelial barrier in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation: Lessons learned from animal models and human genetics’, Frontiers in immunology., 4.

"The gut mucosa is constantly challenged by a bombardment of foreign antigens and environmental microorganisms. As such, the precise regulation of the intestinal barrier allows the maintenance of mucosal immune homeostasis and prevents the onset of uncontrolled inflammation. In support of this concept, emerging evidence points to defects in components of the epithelial barrier as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In fact, the integrity of the intestinal barrier relies on different elements, including robust innate immune responses, epithelial paracellular permeability, epithelial cell integrity, as well as the production of mucus." (Pastorelli et al., 2013)

Qin, J., Li, R., Raes, J., Arumugam, M., Burgdorf, K.S., Manichanh, C., Nielsen, T., Pons, N., Levenez, F., Yamada, T., Mende, D.R., Li, J., Xu, J., Li, S., Li, D., Cao, J., Wang, B., Liang, H., Zheng, H., Xie, Y., Tap, J., Lepage, P., Bertalan, M., Batto, J.-M., Hansen, T., Paslier, D.L., Linneberg, A., Nielsen, B.H., Pelletier, E., Renault, P., Sicheritz-Ponten, T., Turner, K., Zhu, H., Yu, C., Jian, M., Zhou, Y., Li, Y., Zhang, X., Qin, N., Yang, H., Wang, J., Brunak, S., Doré, J., Guarner, F., Kristiansen, K., Pedersen, O., Parkhill, J., Weissenbach, J., Bork, P. and Ehrlich, D.S. (2010) ‘A human gut microbial gene catalog established by metagenomic sequencing’, 464(7285).

"It has been estimated that the microbes in our bodies collectively make up to 100 trillion cells, ten-fold the number of human cells, and suggested that they encode 100-fold more unique genes than our own genome1. The majority of microbes resides in the gut, have a profound influence on human physiology and nutrition and are crucial for human life2,3. Furthermore, the gut microbes contribute to energy harvest from food, and changes of gut microbiome may be associated with bowel diseases or obesity4-8." (Qin et al., 2010)

Shen, J., Obin and Zhao, L. (2012) ‘The gut microbiota, obesity and insulin resistance’, Molecular aspects of medicine., 34(1), pp. 39–58.

"the gut microbiota plays a significant role in the development of obesity, obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. In this review we discuss molecular and cell biological mechanisms by which the microbiota participate in host functions that impact the development and maintenance of the obese state, including host ingestive behavior, energy harvest, energy expenditure and fat storage." (Shen, Obin, and Zhao, 2012)

Turnbaugh, P., Ley, R., Mahowald, M., Magrini, V., Mardis, E. and Gordon, J. (2006) ‘An obesity-associated gut microbiome with increased capacity for energy harvest’, Nature., 444(7122), pp. 1027–31.

"the obese microbiome has an increased capacity to harvest energy from the diet. Furthermore, this trait is transmissible" (Turnbaugh et al., 2006)

Yang, S., Hsieh, C., Kuo, H., Lee, Huang, M., Kuo, C. and Hung, C. (2014) ‘The effects of environmental toxins on allergic inflammation’, Allergy, asthma & immunology research., 6(6), pp. 478–84.

"The prevalence of asthma and allergic disease has increased worldwide over the last few decades. Many common environmental factors are associated with this increase. Several theories have been proposed to account for this trend, especially those concerning the impact of environmental toxicants. .... in the activity of the immune system," (Yang et al., 2014)

Zhang, H., DiBaise, J.K., Zuccolo, A., Kudrna, D., Braidotti, M., Yu, Y., Parameswaran, P., Crowell, M.D., Wing, R., Rittmann, B.E. and Krajmalnik-Brown, R. (2009) ‘Human gut microbiota in obesity and after gastric bypass’, 106(7).

"confirm an association between methanogenic Archaea and obesity. The normal-weight individuals had no methanogens" (Zhang et al., 2009)

"Prevotellaceae, a subgroup of Bacteroidetes, was significantly enriched in the obese individuals." (Zhang et al., 2009)

"our results clearly show that an effective surgical treatment for morbid obesity, RYGB, markedly altered the stool microbial community structure toward a large increase in Gammaproteobacteria (96.2% of which were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae), a proportional decrease in Firmicutes, and a loss of methanogens." (Zhang et al., 2009)

Ackermann, W., Coenen, M., Schrödl, W., Shehata, A. and Krüger, M. (2014) ‘The influence of glyphosate on the microbiota and production of botulinum neurotoxin during ruminal fermentation’, Current microbiology., 70(3), pp. 374–82.

 

"glyphosate had an inhibitory effect on select groups of the ruminal microbiota, but increased the population of pathogenic species" (Ackermann et al., 2014)

Bibliography

Ackermann, W., Coenen, M., Schrödl, W., Shehata, A. and Krüger, M. (2014) ‘The influence of glyphosate on the microbiota and production of botulinum neurotoxin during ruminal fermentation’, Current microbiology., 70(3), pp. 374–82.

Arrieta, M.C., Bistritz, L. and Meddings, J.B. (2006) ‘Alterations in intestinal permeability’, 55(10).

Chassaing, B., Etienne-Mesmin, L. and Gewirtz, A.T. (2013) ‘Microbiota-Liver axis in Hepatic disease’, 59(1).

De Santis, S., Cavalcanti, E., Mastronardi, M., Jirillo, E. and Chieppa, M. (2015) ‘Nutritional keys for intestinal barrier modulation’, 6.

Fasano, A. (2011) ‘Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases’, Clinical reviews in allergy & immunology., 42(1), pp. 71–8.

Fasano, A. and Shea-Donohue, T. (2005) ‘Mechanisms of disease: The role of intestinal barrier function in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal autoimmune diseases’, Nature clinical practice. Gastroenterology & hepatology., 2(9), pp. 416–22.

Frazier, T., DiBaise, J. and McClain, C. (2011) ‘Gut microbiota, intestinal permeability, obesity-induced inflammation, and liver injury’, JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition., 35.

Gress, S., Lemoine, S., Séralini, G. and Puddu, P. (2014) ‘Glyphosate-based herbicides potently affect cardiovascular system in mammals: Review of the literature’, Cardiovascular toxicology., 15(2), pp. 117–26.

Kelly, J., Kennedy, P., Cryan, J., Dinan, T., Clarke, G. and Hyland, N. (2015) ‘Breaking down the barriers: The gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders’, Frontiers in cellular neuroscience., 9.

Lamprecht, M., Bogner, S., Schippinger, G., Steinbauer, K., Fankhauser, F., Hallstroem, S., Schuetz, B. and Greilberger, J. (2012) ‘Probiotic supplementation affects markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation, and inflammation in trained men; a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial’, Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition., 9(1).

Lamprecht, M. and Frauwallner, A. (2012) ‘Exercise, intestinal barrier dysfunction and probiotic supplementation’, Medicine and sport science., 59, pp. 47–56.

Molinaro, F., Paschetta, E., Cassader, M., Gambino, R. and Musso, G. (2012) ‘Probiotics, prebiotics, energy balance, and obesity: Mechanistic insights and therapeutic implications’, Gastroenterology clinics of North America., 41(4), pp. 843–54.

Pastorelli, L., Salvo, D., Mercado, J., Vecchi, M. and Pizarro, T. (2013) ‘Central role of the gut epithelial barrier in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation: Lessons learned from animal models and human genetics’, Frontiers in immunology., 4.

Pigrau, M., Rodiño-Janeiro, B., Casado-Bedmar, M., Lobo, B., Vicario, M., Santos, J. and Alonso-Cotoner, C. (2015) ‘The joint power of sex and stress to modulate brain-gut-microbiota axis and intestinal barrier homeostasis: Implications for irritable bowel syndrome’, Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society., .

Qin, J., Li, R., Raes, J., Arumugam, M., Burgdorf, K.S., Manichanh, C., Nielsen, T., Pons, N., Levenez, F., Yamada, T., Mende, D.R., Li, J., Xu, J., Li, S., Li, D., Cao, J., Wang, B., Liang, H., Zheng, H., Xie, Y., Tap, J., Lepage, P., Bertalan, M., Batto, J.-M., Hansen, T., Paslier, D.L., Linneberg, A., Nielsen, B.H., Pelletier, E., Renault, P., Sicheritz-Ponten, T., Turner, K., Zhu, H., Yu, C., Jian, M., Zhou, Y., Li, Y., Zhang, X., Qin, N., Yang, H., Wang, J., Brunak, S., Doré, J., Guarner, F., Kristiansen, K., Pedersen, O., Parkhill, J., Weissenbach, J., Bork, P. and Ehrlich, D.S. (2010) ‘A human gut microbial gene catalog established by metagenomic sequencing’, 464(7285).

Shen, J., Obin and Zhao, L. (2012) ‘The gut microbiota, obesity and insulin resistance’, Molecular aspects of medicine., 34(1), pp. 39–58.

Turnbaugh, P., Ley, R., Mahowald, M., Magrini, V., Mardis, E. and Gordon, J. (2006) ‘An obesity-associated gut microbiome with increased capacity for energy harvest’, Nature., 444(7122), pp. 1027–31.

Yang, S., Hsieh, C., Kuo, H., Lee, Huang, M., Kuo, C. and Hung, C. (2014) ‘The effects of environmental toxins on allergic inflammation’, Allergy, asthma & immunology research., 6(6), pp. 478–84.

Zhang, H., DiBaise, J.K., Zuccolo, A., Kudrna, D., Braidotti, M., Yu, Y., Parameswaran, P., Crowell, M.D., Wing, R., Rittmann, B.E. and Krajmalnik-Brown, R. (2009) ‘Human gut microbiota in obesity and after gastric bypass’, 106(7).

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