Can Magnesium Help Me Lose Weight?

NutritionCan Magnesium Help Me Lose Weight?

Magnesium Deficiency Is Associated With Insulin Resistance in Obese Patients

Magnesium and Obesity

One potential cause for lower serum magnesium in obese youth is low dietary magnesium intake.   Studies do show that the calorie-adjusted magnesium intake in obese children was lower compared with lean children. Hypomagnesemia (serum magnesium 0.78 mmol/l) was present in 27% of healthy lean children and 55% of obese children. The body does so by activating hundreds of enzymes in the body. Magnesium helps you get the most from what you eat so you can be satisfied with no more than the amount of food you genuinely need.

Since conditions like insulin resistance and diabetes are strongly associated with obesity, controlling blood sugar levels is a key factor in maintaining a healthy weight. When enough magnesium is present in the body, insulin can function properly and blood glucose is used for energy. A magnesium deficiency causes insulin to function poorly, resulting in high blood sugar and fat storage. Magnesium is a co-factor of many enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. Magnesium has an important role in insulin action, and insulin stimulates magnesium uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues. Magnesium is required for both proper glucose utilization and insulin signaling. Metabolic alterations in cellular magnesium, which may play the role of a second messenger for insulin action, contribute to insulin resistance. Magnesium is needed to extract energy from food and for optimal insulin function. The more energy you extract from food the less you have to eat to feel great.

Stress

Stress management is one of the most important keys in fighting obesity, and magnesium is a vital nutrient for reducing stress. This is because magnesium supports healthy adrenal glands. These are the glands that control the release of adrenaline and cortisol, two hormones related to the stress response. While these hormones are vital to living, too much of them can cause weight gain and other health problems. Magnesium helps regulate these hormones so they are not overproduced. Magnesium also regulates nervous system response. When we have a magnesium deficiency, our nervous system is over-stimulated, leading to irritation, nervousness and stress. When there is plenty of magnesium, the mind and body are finally able to relax and reverse the effects of stress.

Magnesium: What is it? 

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body and is essential to good health. Approximately 50% of total body magnesium is found in bone. The other half is found predominantly inside cells of body tissues and organs. Only 1% of magnesium is found in blood, however, the body works very hard to keep blood levels of magnesium constant.

Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, supports a healthy immune system, and keeps bones strong. Magnesium also helps regulate blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and is known to be involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis.

There is an increased interest in the role of magnesium in preventing and managing disorders such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Dietary magnesium is absorbed in the small intestines. Magnesium is excreted through the kidneys.

Green vegetables such as spinach are good sources of magnesium because the center of the chlorophyll molecule (which gives green vegetables their color) contains magnesium. Some legumes (beans and peas), nuts and seeds, and whole, unrefined grains are also good sources of magnesium. Refined grains are generally low in magnesium. When white flour is refined and processed, the magnesium-rich germ and bran are removed. Diabetes is a disease resulting in insufficient production and/or inefficient use of insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Insulin helps convert sugar and starches in food into energy to sustain life.

There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in children and adolescents, and results from the body’s inability to make insulin.   Type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes referred to as adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. It is usually seen in adults and is most often associated with an inability to use the insulin made by the pancreas.

Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. In recent years, rates of type 2 diabetes have increased along with the rising rates of obesity.

Magnesium and cardiovascular disease

Magnesium metabolism is very important to insulin sensitivity and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium deficiency is common in individuals with diabetes. The observed associations between magnesium metabolism, diabetes, and high blood pressure increase the likelihood that magnesium metabolism may influence cardiovascular disease.

Magnesium and osteoporosis

Bone health is supported by many factors, most notably calcium and vitamin D. However, some evidence suggests that magnesium deficiency may be an additional risk factor for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

Leptin and Magnesium

The new fashion in obesity is to look at the role of leptin. Leptin is a hormone that triggers your sense of feeling full. A leptin deficiency can cause overeating, leading to obesity and obesity-related disease.

Most people don’t have a leptin deficiency – they have lost their sensitivity to leptin, which is called leptin resistance.   Much like insulin resistance, it’s possible to have enough leptin, but because your body doesn’t use it effectively, you still feel hungry. Leptin resistance is a serious health issue. Essentially you are overfeeding your body but the perception from your brain is that you are starving because you actually are missing vital nutrients such as magnesium.


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